fruits

Magnesium- the Forgotten Nutrient!

Posted on Updated on

Magnesium is an essential nutrient. Magnesium is the fourth most abundant cation on the human body. It plays a central role in energy production, glycolysis, and synthesis of proteins and nucleic acids (DNA and RNA). Among other actions, magnesium is a co-factor for more that 300 enzymes and is essential to cell growth and function, energy storage and production, stabilization of cell membrane, nerve conduction, muscle contraction and the function of ion channels.

Despite magnesium central role in physiology and health, it is under consumed by most Americans, leading to chronic magnesium deficiency and increased risk for multiple serious health conditions, such as, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, bone disease, depression, hypertension, kidney disease, migraines and metabolic syndrome.

The main factors underlying reduced magnesium intake are the declining nutrient content of produce and refined grains and increased consumption of processed foods, sugars and saturated fats.

Dietary sources of magnesium include many whole foods, such as unrefined grains, vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds and legumes.

Magnesium is an essential nutrient for human health. Deficiencies of magnesium increase risk for serious chronic diseases, whereas increased intake through improved diet and supplementation can improve health status and reduce disease risk. For many people, the addition of a magnesium supplement may be required to replete magnesium stores and maintain healthy levels over long term.

Advertisements

Food Rainbow and what it means!

Posted on Updated on

Food color and Phytochemicals!
 
The truth is that the more color your fresh produce has, the better it is for you. That’s because of one thing: phytochemicals.
Phytochemicals are only found in plants. They act to protect us from inflammation. They’re also a good way to tell that a fruit or vegetable has lots of nutrients.
Here is an easy to remember trick to help you know which foods are most good for your body.

Yellow/Orange
Carrots, cantaloupe, pumpkin and sweet potatoes. These are just a few of the orange foods that are known for their high levels of beta-carotene.
These foods are high in antioxidants and are good for our vision because they contain Vitamin A.

Red
Tomatoes, cranberries, pink grapefruit and watermelon. Most fruits and vegetables that are red contain lycopene.
Lycopene lowers the risk of cancer and improves the health of our tissues. Red foods also contain vitamin C and flavonoids can help reduce inflammation and prevent bacteria from attaching to our cells.

Yellow/Green
Avocado, pistachios, kiwi, leafy greens like spinach, and kale. These foods are high in lutein, which is good for eye health. Kiwi fruit is also high in vitamin C.

Green
Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, Bok choy and cabbage. Green may be the color we tend to think of most often when it comes to vegetables. There’s good reason for us to think that green is one of the healthiest colors a food can be.
Green vegetables get their color from chlorophyll, and foods that have a lot of chlorophyll are rich in isiothiocyanates. These help the liver move toxins out of our system. They also have vitamin K, folic acid and potassium.

Blue/Purple
Eggplant, blueberries, blackberries, plums and pomegranates. The dark blue and purple colors of these foods comes from anthocyanin. That’s a powerful antioxidant that is heart healthy and lowers high blood pressure. They also fight blood clots.

Black
Black beans, chia seeds, lentils and mushrooms. Black foods are loaded with pigment, and that means that they are high in antioxidants.

50 Super Foods!

Posted on Updated on

50 Superfoods that can help lower your risk of….

Below are some of the suggestions. There are a lot of other foods that are also healthy to eat.

Cardio health Hypertension Bone health Anti-cancer
Almonds

Avocados

Cashews

Hazel nuts

Herring, Atlantic

Mackerel, Atlantic

Olive oil

Pecans

Pistachios

Salmon, pink

Trout, rainbow

Tuna

 

Apples

Asparagus

Bananas

Beans, Kidney

Broccoli

Cabbage

Cantaloupe

Cauliflower

Eggplant

Grapefruit

Honeydew melon

Nectarines

Orange juice

Green Peas

Potatoes

Prunes

Raisins

Squash

Sweet potatoes

Watermelon

Broccoli

Buttermilk

Dandelion greens

Milk

Molasses

Salmon, pink (with bones)

Sardines

Yogurt

Apples

Apricots

Bananas

Beans, Baked

Beans, Kidney

Blackberries

Broccoli

Buttermilk

Cabbage

Cantaloupe

Carrots

High fiber Cereals

Collards

Dandelion greens

Endive, raw

Kale

Milk

Molasses, blackstrap

Mustard greens

Salmon, pink

Sardines

Spinach

Squash

Sweet potatoes

Watermelon

Yogurt

 

So stay Healthy as your lunch can crunch disease….

 

 

Pollution!

Posted on

How to Deal with All the Pollution?

Limit your exposure.

Replace the substances in the house, yard, and skin care products with clean natural alternatives.

Avoid processed food, eat fresh and organic.

Tune up the body’s natural detoxification ability. Supplement with Vitamins and Minerals to boost your immune system.

Perform a whole body purification/ detoxification a minimum of once per year.

 

Boost Mood & Calm Nerves!

Posted on Updated on

8 Foods to boost your Mood and calm Nerves

  1. Dark green leafy vegetables

Spinach, kale and other dark greens are high in folate. Folate helps us to make serotonin and dopamine. Both of these are neurotransmitters that fight depression and stress.

  1. Turkey

Turkey is one of those foods that is linked to happy memories and that is good for us too! It is high in tryptophan. Tryptophan is an amino acid that shifts to serotonin in our bodies. When we eat foods high in tryptophan we are less likely to argue. Other foods high in tryptophan include cage-free eggs and pumpkin seeds.

  1. Foods that are fermented

We know you are thinking of wine and beer here, but let’s look elsewhere! When a food is fermented it contains good bacteria that can help boost your mood.Good choices include yogurt and kombucha tea.

  1. Wild caught salmon

Wild salmon is good for us for so many reasons, and it is a mood booster too. Salmon contains omega-3 fats that studies show helps cut anxiety by 20%.

  1. Blueberries

Blueberries and blackberries both contain anthocyanins. These are what gives them their deep color. They also help the brain make dopamine, a good mood chemical. Blueberries also help us build more of the white blood cells that boost the immune system.

  1. Pistachios

Did you know that these delicious nuts help to dilate your arteries? This means that you have less vascular constriction, and that means less stress on your heart.

  1. Dark chocolate

Chocolate makes us feel better for lots of reasons. In addition to its delicious taste, it also contains anandamide. This is a neurotransmitter that blocks pain and depression. One study showed that eating just 1.5 ounces of dark chocolate a day makes us feel calmer.

  1. Avocado

The delicious green fruit gives us loads of minerals and vitamins and healthy fat. It also keeps our moods steady by helping us to feel full and controlling our blood sugars.

Toxic metal- Mercury!

Posted on

Eating contaminated fish is the foremost source of mercury exposure in the US. It is also released into the air by coal-burning power plants and factories. Mercury passes through the gastrointestinal wall and is disseminated throughout the human body in just 30 hours. The toxic effects of mercury can damage the kidneys and the central nervous system. High mercury intake during pregnancy can spur irreversible damage to the fetus too.

Among all the fruits, strawberries were shown to capture more than 95 percent of all the mercury. The reason strawberries were effective at removing mercury is because they are the only common fruit that has seeds on the outside. These tiny seeds are attached to a dense bundle of plant fibers at the heart of strawberries, which are strong and difficult to digest by people. Strawberry fibers pass through the body more or less intact in the same way insoluble vegetable fibers pass through the body.

Simply eat more strawberries with every meal, especially when consuming fish like salmon, sushi and tuna. If you are not a fan of strawberries, you can substitute them with citrus fruits eaten whole with the fibers intact.

It should be noted that these anti-heavy metal foods only protect against mercury consumed through food. They will not protect the body from mercury that is inhaled through the air nor stop mercury toxicity caused by dental fillings.

The list was originally published on Natural News by Mike Adams in 2015.

Dietary Mercury Binding foods: Clean Chlorella: 99%, Barley Grass: 89%, Hemp Protein: 98%, Acai Berries: 88%, Brown Rice: 53%, Peanut Butter: 96%, Wheat Flour: 86%, Strawberries: 95%, Nori Powder: 85%, Beets: 20%, Cilantro Leaf: 95%, Hawaiian Sprirulina: 83%, Raspberries: 92%, Blueberries: 83%, Cacao Powder: 91% Mangos: 73%, Wheat Grass: 90% Ground Mustard: 72%, Coconut Granola Cereal: 89%.

Iodine!

Posted on

Iodine mineral is important for human health especially in women. Enough iodine will produce estriol. Estriol is a hormone that protects against breast cancer and fibrocystic breast disease.
Iodine plays key role for production of hormones in the thyroid gland. That help to control energy production and other processes in nearly every cell in the body. Urine test can show different levels of iodine.
Iodine can be found in sea vegetables (kelp & wakame), scallops and cod are very good source. As a general rule (that does have numerous exceptions, however), shellfish are more concentrated in iodine than finfish. It is also found in yogurt, cow’s milk, and eggs.
Include these non-seafood, non-dairy foods in your day’s food would most likely provide you with about 5-30% of the iodine you need. found in vegetables like sweet potatoes, onions, and spinach. Fruits like Strawberries, bananas and cantaloupe, grain like barley as well as peanuts.
The Daily Value for iodine in adults is about 150 mcg.